A View from the Top: A Virtual Prototyping Blog

When marketing products, should you emphasize what is included in the product or what is not? These days it seems that for so many foods it has become more important to highlight what is not in the food rather than what is. With sugar free drinks, alcohol free cocktails, gluten free bread and dairy free milk, one might wonder what you should continue to eat or drink. In fact, you now often see food packaging with multiple lines of advertisement to indicate what is not in the food.

Continue Reading...

As highlighted in many of my blog posts, virtual prototyping has really established itself as the key methodology to shift left software development by decoupling the dependency of software development from hardware availability. The success of the “Better Software. Faster!” book  illustrates the wide spread interest in the methodology.

Continue Reading...

While traveling back to California from the U.K., I had a layover in Chicago, which is probably all too familiar to most United Airlines frequent flyer members. Everything went according to schedule until everyone boarded and the plane still didn’t take off. The pilot explained to us that there was a problem with the hatch for the refueling of the aircraft. We were stuck in the plane for about 2 hours. Eventually the captain announced “We have just about enough fuel to get us to San Francisco.” While I don’t doubt that United wouldn’t allow an airplane to take off if it had  “just about enough fuel,” it was an interesting set of words to hear from the captain. This made me wonder what does, “just about enough” mean in the context of software development and virtual prototyping.

Continue Reading...

Last month we undertook a big family trip. My parents, my brother and his family came from Belgium to California and together we embarked on a trip across the North West US. Starting in Silicon Valley we drove via Lake Tahoe and Salt Lake City to Yellowstone. Afterwards we crossed over to Seattle and Portland to finish off the trip with visits to Crater Lake and Lassen Volcanic National Parks. In total we travelled about 3,400 miles or 5,500 km.

Continue Reading...

Guest blog by Achim Nohl

Continue Reading...

The recently announced Synopsys IP Accelerated initiative perfectly illustrates how the functionality of a device is equally influenced by the hardware and the software. To enable applications on a particular device to use the interface IP like USB or Ethernet, a software program called a device driver is required to map the generic requests to the underlying hardware functions. Writing a device driver requires an in-depth understanding of how the hardware and software work for a given platform function.

Continue Reading...

I recently bought myself an activity tracker. The watch-like device keeps track of how many steps I take and how high I climb, such as the amount of vertical feet I “conquer” by taking the stairs. From that it calculates the distance I travel and the amount of calories that I burn in a day. The device can also measure my heart rate and the oxygen level in my blood, but given the high heart rate I supposedly have even without doing any exercise, I seriously doubt the accuracy of the device on those accounts. While the information displayed on the device screen itself is already interesting, the data gathering and analysis opportunity multiplies through connectivity of the activity tracker with my iPhone. Through a Bluetooth connection, I can transfer all the data to a dedicated app on my iPhone. On top of that I log other activities like strength training and biking activity on another app that synchronizes the data with my activity tracker app. Plus if you want to, you can log all the food you eat and thus your calorie intake with a third app that again syncs with the activity tracker app comparing actual calorie intake versus calorie consumption.

Continue Reading...

The question in the title has been one of the most asked questions by my son lately. Or as my wife says, his brain is 90% focused on Minecraft and 10% on everything else. For those not familiar with Minecraft, it is a lego-like computer game or as the Minecraft website reads: “Minecraft is a game about breaking and placing blocks.” It has literally captured the imagination of my son and to lesser extent, of my daughter as well. They can build houses, boats, clouds, towers, bushes shaped like pokemons and so on. And since building the same stuff over and over again would be boring, the question of “What should I build next?” comes up a lot. As with any building environment (virtual or real), what you can build is bound only by the available building blocks. So the Minecraft developers have provided users with all sorts of building blocks like wood and stone. Other blocks like water and lava are also available and can be used to achieve interesting effects. Different coloring options put the finishing touch to any construction.

Continue Reading...

As virtual prototyping has seen a wide adoption over the last couple of years, it felt like the right time to work with industry leaders across multiple applications and publish a book that captures the best practices in virtual prototyping. As editor of the book: Better Software. Faster!, I had the privilege to work with some incredibly knowledgeable people who have been deploying virtual prototypes for many years. The book captures the main benefits of virtual prototyping as the key methodology to shift left the design cycle: namely reduce the overall time-to-market by starting software development before hardware availability. Better Software. Faster! features case studies and best practices from companies across mobile, consumer, automotive and industrial applications including: Altera, ARM Bosch, Fujitsu, General Motors, Hitachi, Lauterbach, Linaro, Microsoft, Ricoh, Renesas, Siemens, Texas Instruments and VDC Research. As editor I can of course not do anything less than recommend you read the book, but really … do read the book ;-).

Continue Reading...

Last week I was traveling across North America visiting customers. Besides being amazed at how cold it is in the rest of North America (I live in Silicon Valley where the sun has barely left us during the entire winter), it was good to talk to a wide variety of companies and discuss their software development needs. We encountered three types of companies considering the use of virtual prototyping to pull in their software development schedule:

Continue Reading...