To USB or Not to USB

 

Go to market months faster with Hybrid IP Prototyping (HIP) AND USB 3.1 Shipping from its Creator

Hybrid IP Prototyping and USB 3.1 ahead, but first an opening joke

An old man thinks his wife is losing her hearing. He calls the doctor about it and the doctor says he can do a little experiment to determine the severity, “Ask her a question from the next room in a normal tone of voice, and keep asking while coming closer until she can hear you. That way you know the range of her hearing.”

That night, he’s sitting on his easy chair in the living room while his wife is in the kitchen cooking dinner. He estimates he’s about 30 feet away. In a normal tone of voice, he says, “What’s for dinner?”

She doesn’t respond, so he gets up and walks to the kitchen doorway, about 20 feet away, and asks, “What’s for dinner?”

She still doesn’t respond so he walks 10 feet closer and asks, “What’s for dinner?”

She still doesn’t say anything, so he gets right up beside her and asks, “What’s for dinner?”

She says, “For the fourth time we’re having chicken!”

This joke reminds me of how I learned about Hybrid IP Prototyping.  After about 1 hour of discussion with our engineering experts on Hybrid Prototyping, I think I’ve heard/understand all the value that comes from Hybrid IP Prototyping, or HIP prototyping. (Thank you for your patience)

Get HIP, Save Time

  • RESULT – drivers ready immediately when FPGA prototypes or silicon are ready.
  • Software engineers can get started IMMEDIATELY
    • No Waiting for Hardware engineers to deliver RTL or FPGA platforms
    • Write drivers in C
    • No new methodologies
    • Use your favorite 3rd party debuggers you already know
    • No Hardware engineers needed
      • No FPGA reprogramming needed,
      • Models available for ARM and ARC (yeah, we know you all use ARM…)
      • Real time interoperability
        • Connect through from Virtual to FPGA to real, external products
        • Real drivers running at real time

It’s clear to me that choosing Hybrid Prototyping is the only way to develop new chips with new microprocessors.  You save so a tremendous amount of time.

The process goes something like this.  You take our Hybrid IP Prototyping Kit which includes both  Virtual Prototyping Kit (models that run on any PC) and a IP Prototyping Kit (FPGA Hardware with our IP pre-installed)

DesignWare Hybrid IP Prototyping Kits - What is HIP

Virtual saves time

The Virtual Prototyping Kit (VDK) includes the Virtualizer, Models of a Microprocessor (use yours or ours).  Any software programmer can develop and run drivers in pure C.  They can use the debuggers they always use. The models of the microprocessor and other IP will run and respond.

The reason this saves time is because if you are moving to a new microprocessor, like an ARM A57/A53, or an ARC processor, the software developers can start working on drivers IMMEDIATELY.   No waiting for RTL or FPGA prototypes or chips.  The models are already here today.

In fact, every major mobile applications processor chip company already does this.  They use VDKs for driver development.  The SoCs are bigger and more complex, and they have 1000s of software people.

The advantage of this is that the drivers are real drivers, the models run “at speed” meaning nothing gets slowed down.

Big bonus: The Software engineer doesn’t need to know how to use an FPGA board.  Doesn’t need to know how to configure RTL, or synthesize RTL, or close timing of the RTL to fit it on the FPGA board.

IP Prototyping Kit with our USB IP already programmed into it with our PHY Card.  You connect via PCIe from the IP Prototyping kit into to a Linux PC running the VDK. (It could be used with a standard Windows PC if it isn’t being used for HIP.)

The IP Prototyping Kit saves time because you can put your exact USB 3.0 (or USB 3.1) product onto that hardware.  In Device mode, the system is reprogrammable to act as almost any kind of device. So you can use it out of the box for prototyping.   If you want to customize it, you can. A Hardware engineer can go ahead, and re-synthesize our controller in the design, adding your special logic.

However, for 90% of what software engineers need, the IP Prototyping Kit can be used as is.

When used together with the VDK, the IP Prototyping kits become the Hybrid Prototyping kit.

IP Prototyping Kit saves Time

IP Prototyping Kit with our USB IP already programmed into it with our PHY Card.  You connect via PCIe from the IP Prototyping kit into to  (Picture above)

The IP Prototyping Kit saves time because you can put your exact USB 3.0  product onto that hardware.

As a Device,  the system is reprogrammable to act as almost any kind of device. So you can use it out of the box for prototyping.   If you want to customize it, you can. A Hardware engineer can go ahead, and re-synthesize our controller in the design, adding your special logic.

As a Host, you can test different USB peripherals, real ones, against the real drivers, while the microprocessor is still under development.

For 90% of what software engineers need, the IP Prototyping Kit can be used as is.

When used together with the VDK, the IP Prototyping kits become the Hybrid Prototyping kit.

They allow for the speed of driver development with the VDK and real testing with real products with the IP Prototyping Kits with that real USB port.

You really need to be looking at this for your new design

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USB 3.1 from it’s Creator arrives in 2015

Gigabyte announced it will support a Thunderbolt 3 platform with integrated USB 3.1 Host support on PCs later this year.   The chip will be sourced from the innovator that invented USB.

It’s a Premium USB 3.1 I/O controller.

http://www.gigabyte.com/press-center/news-page.aspx?nid=1370

And here’s a robot that can make over 300 custom made burgers each hour.

https://youtu.be/iQ_fSP3LGw8?t=24s

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