Breaking The Three Laws

 

Reduce WNS by up to 60%, sometime more

Bats with White Nose Syndrome. Please help reduce the spread of this and wash boots, clothes and equipment between caves

The WNS I am talking about is Worst Case Negative Slack and not White Nose Syndrome, a disease in North American bats which, as of 2012, was associated with at least 5.7 million to 6.7 million bat deaths. Please help and stop the spread of this nasty disease. Poor little bats have no defense against it. The WNS I’m going to talk about is Worst Case Negative Slack of a prototyping design, reduce WNS and prototype execution performance increases.

A couple of weeks back I blogged on Timing Biased Partitioning and received a number of follow up questions and comments. This blog is to hopefully answer those and provide more information on the Synopsys capabilities to optimize for the highest system performance on your HAPS-based prototype.

The first question, actually statement was from one of the Synopsys engineers who correctly pointed out that my blog title only covers a fraction of what HAPS ProtoCompiler does in the area of prototype performance optimization. In addition to reducing the number of multi-hop paths during the automated partition stage, ProtoCompiler can also reduce the path length and automatically use a lower pin mux ration on multi-hop paths. The combination of these result in the highest performance prototype. In essence timing biased capabilities cross the partition, system route and system generate stages of the prototyping design flow.

Something that I did not mention in the previous blog was the recommendations for pin mux ratios for optimized performance, so here they are.

  • All paths are not critical
    • Some paths don’t need to be fast
    • False paths and asynchronous clock crossing
    • Slow clocks and debug paths
  • Some paths are just fast, pipeline paths with little logic
  • Don’t use one HAPS HSTDM ratio everywhere
    • Lower ratios on critical paths
    • Higher ratios on non-critical path
    • HAPS ProtoCompiler supports ratios up to 128:1
  • HAPS Hardware Traces are precious
    • High ratios on non-critical paths, frees up traces for critical paths (HAPS flexible interconnect)
  • No cost to mixing ratios with HAPS HSTDM
    • Source sync clock is shared across ratios
    • No overhead of mixing ratios

Much of this is automated in HAPS ProtoCompiler but the 2nd question was why these timing biased capabilities are not default “ON”. The answer is that typically the goal at the start of the project is Time to First Prototype (TTFP), and you sacrifice performance optimization to get a valid solution in the least amount of time. Optimization for performance, while automated, increases the runtime of the tool. The recommendation is that you utilize the HAPS ProtoCompiler TTFP mode to generate a feasible solution and hand this off to your developers. While it might not be performance optimized your developers will thank you as you delivered it very quickly. They can be very productive debugging the initial HW/SW integration, board support software and completing initial OS boot procedures. With your developers busy and happy you have an extra day or so to optimize the platform for performance. Now you turn on timing biased capabilities as you can afford the slightly longer runtime to a feasible solution. This is an iterative process as you play with partition, route and physical interconnect on the HAPS systems.

The results of HAPS ProtoCompiler timing biased capabilities are astonishing and I was able to get my hands on the results of these capabilities from a suite of test designs. This suite of designs consist of real customer designs which we have gather over time (with permission). The goal of this testing was to judge the automated capabilities of the tools.

HAPS & ProtoCompiler test suite of designs for timing bias optimization benchmarks

First the “hop” reduction with multi_hop_path optimization enabled is amazing. It’s hard to see in the picture but all designs yielded multi-hop path reduction with the capability enabled.

HAPS ProtoCompiler multi-hop reduction. Less hops = higher system execution performance

Second, the effect to worse case negative slack showed up to 60% reduction. Reduce WNS and performance is improved !!!!

HAPS ProtoCompiler timing bias optimization WNS reduction yields up to 60% execution performance improvement

The funny thing is that the effect on runtime is not huge so while above we recommend a TTFP flow first and then a timing optimized flow you can be successful in generating a timing optimized solution right out of the starting gate. Well at least a version where you have enabled the capabilities but spend no time analyzing the output. Remember, to get the most out of the HAPS solution you should tailor the HAPS hardware flexible interconnect to the SoC partition needs.

I’ve not had much time for projects recently and the next couple of months are busy, busy, busy with business stuff but I have been making slow progress on my new gaming console in a briefcase. Below you can see pictures of the custom controllers, I had to make them small to ensure they fit inside a briefcase. The second picture is a mock up of the monitor and controllers in the briefcase. You open the case and the monitor pulls up and can be rotated for vertical and horizontal play. The whole system is powered by two 7 ah 12v sealed batteries which based on the current draw should enable 5 hours of play before needing to be charged. There are 912 games installed, all the old school favorites like pacman, donkey kong, street fighter, 1945 etc…

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Mick Built Toys, new gaming console in a briefcase controllers

Mick Built Toys, prototype of monitor and controllers in a briefcase

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