Breaking The Three Laws

 

Prototyping at the Consumer Electronics Show, CES

Let me be the last to wish you “Happy New Year” and all that….

Of course it was the Consumer Electronics Show, CES recently and no good blogger would let this opportunity pass without writing something about it. Regardless of this I’m still going to write something. (If you got that joke comment below)

Hot at CES was self-drive cars with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), Sling TV, SuperHD TV’s, robots and of course wearables and the Internet of Things, IoT, because everyone wants a cooker with built in internet browser (well I do but as I already have a full PC in the kitchen for streaming TV and web browsing I will hold off on buying a cooker with similar capabilities)

It was nice to see that a number of projects that I know have been prototyped were being debuted at CES. It’s very fulfilling seeing a product go from idea to reality. While the big buzz was around everything you could see it’s the things you could not see which I want to discuss this week. These little electronic gadgets power the world of self-drive cars, wearables and IoT…. Yes I’m talking about sensors!!!!!

Wearables powered by sensors

ADAS Sensors

Lets face it, the sensors themselves don’t make the product but without them the device would not be able to operate so they really are the little product hero’s. Managing and data acquisition from these sensors can be a complex project in itself which is why Synopsys made it easier with the DesignWare Sensor and Control Subsystem.

DesignWare Sensor and Control Subsystem

This nifty subsystem is optimized to process data from digital and analog sensors, offloading the host processor and enabling more power efficient processing of the sensor data. The DesignWare Sensor and Control IP Subsystem provides designers with a complete, pre-verified solution that optimizes sensor fusion and actuator/motor control functions increasingly prevalent in automotive, mobile, industrial and IoT markets.

If you look at the block diagram above you can see that the interface to these sensors is usually pretty simple, UART, DAC/ADC, SPI, I2C and basic GPIO with the most complex interface being AMBA APB. I worked with a user recently who wanted to incorporate sensor information directly into their FPGA-based Prototype. The solution we came up with was to utilize off-the-shelf Peripheral Module interface, PMOD, boards. PMOD is a standard defined by Digilent Inc : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pmod_Interface

PMOD sensor example

Diligent have a wide range of these little modules: http://www.digilentinc.com/Products/Catalog.cfm?NavPath=2,401&Cat=9 covering various applications.

Note that the PMOD’s are typically a standard 6-Pin interface with 4 signals, one ground and one power pin so very low pin count. The user connected these to the new HAPS GPIO board, pictured below, in order to interface the modules into their custom design modeled within HAPS.

HAPS GPIO board, easy way to connect switches, LED's, sensors and much, much more into your HAPS modeled design

Note that the HAPS GPIO board is a vertical mounted board so just like the PMOD’s themselves do not take up much physical real estate.

HAPS GPIO board mounted

We ended up making full use of the HAPS GPIO board with multiple PMODs connected, interface to the ARM debugger, LED’s to signal various operational states and push switches to simulate user input. The GPIO board is very versatile with 3 standard 3.3V HAPS 10-pin GPIO headers, (Compatible with HAPS BIO1), 2 high-speed VCCO level GPIO headers (Red), 20-pin ARM JTAG header, Micro-USB for UART, MMCX clock connectors, 5V TTL header for serial LCD display, Level shifted header for I2C and SPI, 6 buttons and 4 LEDs on mini-daughter board which is connected to 3.3V HAPS 10-pin GPIO header when needed.

Unfortunately I was sick during the break so I didn’t get to as many of my little projects as I would have liked. I did however manage to complete one of them that I had been excited about for a while now. I made myself a portable gaming station complete with 412 games from the 1980-1990 era.

Mick Built Toys: Video Gaming Center. Waste away years of your life on mindless games

The whole setup packs away in a study roller case (which I got used which is why it’s so beat up). Open it up and pull the control station to the top of the box, plug it in and you are off. Favorite games like Pacman, Space Invaders, 1945, Donkey Kong and many, many more. I can now waste away many hours into the wee night playing mindless video games.

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