Breaking The Three Laws

 

SW Dev Env using ARM-based daughter board directly vs. Hybrid Prototype

Amazingly this is a REAL animal, it's called a Liger

This week’s blog is a bit of a mashup (Yes that is a real word, a mashup, in development, is something that uses content from more than one source to create a single new offering) as I am pulling together two topics to create one. The #1 usage case of prototyping is for early software development. You can do this very early, pre-RTL using Virtual Prototypes, later in the design cycle with FPGA-based Prototypes but it’s the bit in the middle that this week’s blog examines.

The bit in the middle is typically unit level or IP validation with the goal of early software development before the rest of the subsystem is available. The DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits : http://www.synopsys.com/IP/ip-accelerated/Pages/ip-prototyping-kits.aspx were designed to address the need for immediate productivity and early software development for DesignWare IP’s. The kit includes the actual DesignWare IP modeled on HAPS-DX and an ARC based Software Development Platform

The ARC Software Development Platform based DesignWare IP Prototyping kit

The question which has been raised a couple of times is what if you are not using an ARC processor in your end SoC? At this point I usually start probing a little more as to what type of software is being developed, if its physical layer and processor specific then yes the ARC software development platform is not going to work for you. If it’s higher layer software then typically the software engineer does not care as it’s layers above and abstracted from the physical execution machine. But what do you do in the case where you need physical layer and processor specific software development?

Lets use the example that you want to enable early software development on an ARM-based system representation and you still want to validate your design under test modeled on a FPGA-based prototype. The problem is that your SoC engineers have not complete the subsystem design and/or you don’t have access to the RTL to put the processor subsystem on the FPGA-based prototype along with your DUT.

One solution would be to do similar to what Synopsys did with the DesignWare IP Kits and that is connect the FPGA-based prototyping platform to a physical daughter board containing an ARM-based subsystem. One of the possible ways to do this is to use an off-the-shelf Xilinx Zynq based daughter board. The Zynq device includes a Dual Cortex-A9 MPCore processor subsystem and provides the ability to connect this to the FPGA-based prototyping platform via an AXI tunnel across typically FMC connectors. This is true for the HAPS series where you have the ability to connect the Zynq based board to HAPS via FMC cables.

Xilinx Zynq ARM-based subsystem including Dual Cortex-A9 MPCore's

Great right? Hummm…. Seems too good to be true…… Yes, you are right, this use mode is a trade-off. While you can execute ARM-based code against your prototype you are not running the software against YOUR ARM-based subsystem. You are stuck with the processor configuration hard-coded into the Zynq device which you know will never match your SoC subsystem. Also, in the case of the Zynq it’s the 32bit processors not the 64bit versions. There is a better way to enable early software development using a processor subsystem which is a better match to your SoC’s subsystem, it’s the Hybrid Prototyping approach.

I’ve blogged about this before, one such case was Zoro’s use of Hybrid Prototype for early software development for USB 3.0 : http://blogs.synopsys.com/breakingthethreelaws/2014/06/zoro-delivers-hybrid-prototype-for-early-software-development/

The advantage of using a Hybrid Prototype rather than a fixed hardware daughter board is that the virtual processor based subsystem can be tailored to more specifically match the SoC subsystem design. New to virtual prototyping? Don’t worry, Synopsys provides ARM Virtual Development Kits (VDK’s): http://www.synopsys.com/Prototyping/VirtualPrototyping/Virtualizer-Development/Pages/vdk-family-arm.aspx to jump start your development. These VDK’s can be used at the starting point for your customization to match your SoC’s need. This full virtual environment is expanded to a Hybrid Prototype with the use of the off-the-shelf transactors which are a bridge between the TLM virtual and the RTL hardware systems. You are not sacrificing performance either as the Synopsys Hybrid Prototyping solution enables asynchronous operation between the Virtualizer and HAPS ensuring that the software env executes at speed as well as the hardware env which is typically required to keep real world interfaces alive.

Hybrid Prototype. ARM-based Virtual Development Env running with the HAPS-based prototype

What a mashup !!! It’s clear to me that Hybrid Prototyping is a far better solution to enable early software development as you can customize the processor subsystem to more precisely match the SoC. This way the software code created and executed on the prototype is a closer or direct match to the software which will run on the SoC.

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