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An Internet of Things event for you

Posted by Karen B on April 2nd, 2014

Coming soon – April 10th, 2014 to be exact – is an Internet of Things event you might find informative.

Hosted by SEMI, the global industry association serving the manufacturing supply chain for the semiconductor industry, at their headquarters in Silicon Valley, the morning event promises to be interesting.

The event’s title, “The Silicon Valley Breakfast Forum: Internet of Things (IoT) – Driving the Microelectronics Revolution”, is a mouthful and yes, continental breakfast is included.

We are going to talk about what IoT means and what challenges we face from multiple perspectives: standards, EDA, the market, manufacturing, and IP.

Here is the registration link with more information.

I hope you can join us!

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Snowden and Standards

Posted by Karen B on March 11th, 2014

No matter what you think about Edward Snowden – sinner, saint, or something else – he had some interesting things to say yesterday at the SXSW interactive festival. He broadcasted live from Russia via Google+ Hangout into several large halls in the Austin Convention Center which were packed with thousands of people. The session was sponsored by the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union), and the discussion included two gentlemen from the ACLU, Ben Wizner and Chris Soghoian.

What caught my attention most was the mention of technical standards. When Snowden was asked why he was speaking to the technology community, not the policy makers, he said that technologists can enforce our rights for technical standards.

There were several references to the “back door” that the NSA allegedly put into encryption standards, and that mass surveillance is occurring in other countries too, not just the U.S. The issue of privacy and security is a global issue. Snowden said these governments “are setting fire to the future of the Internet”. And the issue is one that technologists can help to address. “The people who are in this room now, you guys, are all the firefighters and we need you to help us fix this,” he stated.

Snowden postulated that mass surveillance can be made so expensive as to be undesirable – through changes in technical standards. It was a call to action when he talked about the commitments we can make today to “protect and enforce our liberties through technical standards to allow us to reclaim the open and trusted”.

One of the initiatives that I am becoming involved in with the IEEE is to rebuild trust in the Internet. Without an open and trusted Internet, the future of technology and humanity will not be what we hope for nor expect. I invite you to join me as the IEEE Internet Initiative takes shape.

Here is the recording of the SXSW broadcast:

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A major milestone – new variation standard established for Liberty

Posted by Karen B on January 22nd, 2014

Here’s to the New Year 2014 for The Standards Game, and kudos to all for your accomplishments in 2013.

image 2013 proved to be a fruitful year for the Liberty Technical Advisory Board (LTAB), an IEEE-ISTO industry standards board, which guides the open-source Liberty™ library modeling standard, an important and essential component to the chip design cycle. Five new members were added to LTAB that comprises of representatives from the EDA, IP, foundry, and semiconductor design community. Further news and details of LTAB can be obtained from its website.

One of the focus activities for the LTAB members in 2013, no easy task I might add, was to incorporate the on-chip variation extensions as part of the Liberty standard. The multiple variation formats in use by different tools clearly was hampering designer productivity. (Sound familiar?) The board met multiple times and successfully consolidated various proprietary modeling formats such as advanced on-chip variation (AOCV), parametric on-chip variation (POCV), and statistical on-chip variation (SOCV) into a single unified open-source standard for industry-wide use, known as the Liberty Variation Format (LVF) extensions. The standardization of OCV extensions in Liberty is a major milestone for the LTAB. It is not just about a format, but it’s about technology enablement and, just as important in my opinion, collaboration across the industry. image

I look forward to updating you on LTAB’s continued collaboration in 2014 to evolve the LVF extensions to better support designs at advanced process nodes.

 

 

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End of the year standards news and interesting links

Posted by Karen B on December 20th, 2013

Here’s a small, end-of-the-year collage of standards news and links you might find interesting. It’s been quite a year, and 2014 is sure to be even better.

Photos from the first annual IEEE Symposium on EDA Interoperability

In light of current events surrounding allegations of government spying, the OpenStand principles could help restore the public’s faith in standards. Here’s a statement about it.

image

And “transparency rules” says the World Wide Web Consortium.

image

Industries such as ours are teaching the health community how to develop effective global health technology standards.

image

The IEEE Standards Association annual awards ceremony was a blast. I got to pass out the awards and tell funny stories about each recipient. Pictures to come.

Happy Holidays and a prosperous 2014 to you and your loved ones, with love from The Standards Game.

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Wake up, Europe! Open, market-driven standards can help you

Posted by Karen B on October 24th, 2013

Recently I participated in the 5th European Innovation Summit, held in Brussels at the European Parliament. The purpose of the annual summit is to bring perspectives from industry, academia, and government on how Europe can become more innovative. Innovation leads to industry, industry leads to jobs, jobs lead to a better economy. The theme of the event was “The Place for Debate on the Future of Innovation in Europe”.

My message? That leveraging open, market-driven standards can help fuel Europe’s innovation and create new markets.

It was a thought-provoking summit where I learned a lot and hopefully left behind some valuable information about the benefit of market-driven standards.

Here are some photos from the event. (Yes, I’m in all of these pictures, sometimes in a “Where’s Waldo” way.)

opening

Opening ceremony. Lambert van Nistelrooy, Chair of the Governing Board, Knowledge for Innovation Forum of the European Parliament, speaking.

horizons

Horizon 2020: from intentions to impact. Panelists speaking about a new program for research and innovation.

energy

Energy transition: opportunities for young people. Small group discussions about the future of energy.

DSC03769 (2) standards1

Beyond Horizon 2020: from funds to market. Avoiding the “valley of death” from research to market, and open, market-driven standards can help.

DSC03789 (2)

Standardization leading to innovation. The OpenStand modern paradigm for standards.

social media

Social media and innovation. Speakers from Facebook and SonicAngel.

closing

Closing ceremony. Knowledge for Innovation sponsors, Friedhelm Schmider, President, and Roland Strauss, Managing Director. That’s me on the right, fading fast.

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The new kid on the EDA interoperability block

Posted by Karen B on October 15th, 2013

There’s a new kid on the EDA interoperability block. It’s the IEEE Standards Association’s Symposium on EDA Interoperability. It will be held on October 14, 2013 October 24, 2013 at the TechMart in Santa Clara CA USA.

The event is open to everyone and there is no cost to attend. But you do have to register – here’s the link: http://bit.ly/1ao2ZGV for registration and details.

The keynote speaker will be the new Managing Director of the IEEE Standards Association, Konstantinos Karachalios. I work with Dr. Karachalios closely, and I think you’ll find him fascinating. He brings a global view of “technology governance”, rooted in standards from the IEEE and other standards-developing organizations. He is an eloquent and thought-provoking speaker, perfect to kick off the new symposium which will be an annual event.

Topics to be discussed at the symposium include power management, semiconductor IP interoperability, and custom design flows (meaning custom/analog design, not build-your-own flow).

A special “unconference” session will wrap up the day’s events. I participated in one of these a while ago, and it was not only a good opportunity to share ideas, but it was also quite fun.

Did I mention that lunch is included? Who says there’s no such thing as a free meal? ;)

I hope you can join me for the premiere episode of the IEEE-SA Symposium on EDA Interoperability.

image

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On the road and open Internet standards

Posted by Karen B on October 11th, 2013

The Standards Game has been on the road, participating in global events and activities that are shaping the future. (By “The Standards Game” I mean me – as President of the IEEE Standards Association, I’m exposed to all kinds of opportunities. Too bad I’m only one person as I’d like to participate in all of them.)

Embedded image permalinkLast November, I attended the Global Standards Symposium in Dubai. During a month-long series of meetings and work projects, there was concern about governments trying to take control over the standards that make the Internet work. Fortunately, this did not come about and the message of open, market-driven standards continued to gain momentum.

At the GSS, I met Monique Morrow of Cisco. She’s a fascinating and accomplished leader. Here’s what she says about not regulating the Internet (scroll to 58 seconds into the video): Monique Morrow, Distinguished Engineer. Here’s a related article about Cisco’s endorsement of open, market-driven standards.

In March of this year, I interviewed Russ Housley, the then chair of the Internet Engineering Task Force. Russ is now the chair of the Internet Architecture Board. In this video, Russ told me how some of the Internet standards are developed and maintained. He, too, speaks in support of open, market-driven standards.

 

As I continue my journey with the IEEE-SA, I’ll be a proud advocate of the OpenStand paradigm of modern, global standards. It’s the paradigm that we in the EDA industry have leveraged since our inception.

 

 

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Who would have thought – standards and SXSW?

Posted by Karen B on April 3rd, 2013

The South-by-Southwest is well known for its film, music, and interactive tracks. The annual SXSW festival (which sounds much more fun than “conference”) is held in Austin, Texas USA. This year it include more than 5,000 events that took place all over the city of Austin.

I had always wanted to attend SXSW to see, hear, and experience the latest trends. Keeping up with the times keeps me excited about the world (and keeps me young at heart). This year, I had the opportunity, not only to attend, but to participate. Because of standards. Really.

The IEEE put on an “Open Future Series” that included a panel on the Internet of Things. The IoT will be enabled through standards, and I was fortunate to be asked to chair the panel. Little did I know that the topic of open standards would be so interesting to those attending and covering SXSW.

Here are a few of the articles, videos, and slides from SXSW and shortly thereafter that deal with the value of open standards:

Tim Berners-Lee on the making of new worlds (article)

Tim Berners-Lee Explains the Necessity of Open Web Standards (article & video)

Tim Berners-Lee and Karen Bartleson on Open Standards: SXSW Forbes Exclusive (YouTube video, same as above)

Two good infrastructure considerations for the internet of things (article)

Digital Telepathy: When Every Thing Connects (panel abstract)

Digital Telepathy: When Every Thing Connects (slides)

Standards: The Connective Tissue Behind the Internet of Things

Revolutionary Technologies Take the Stage at SXSW (article)

Standards: The Jedi Force Behind the Internet of Things (blog post)

And here is another gentleman that I met at SXSW who used standards to change our world, Bob Metcalfe, inventor of Ethernet:

Bob Metcalfe

When standards are part of a huge convention like SXSW, those of us who play the standards game feel like we have arrived. :)

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Posted in 0. OpenStand, 1. Life in the Standards Lane, 4. Be There or Be Square | 2 Comments »

2 Responses to “Who would have thought – standards and SXSW?”

  1. Mary McKiel says:

    Excellent! Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Karen says:

    Thanks, Mary! Hope all is well with you.

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What standards do we need now?

Posted by Karen B on February 14th, 2013

Lions Along Water Beneath Vast Sky Africa We are continuously scanning the landscape, looking for areas where new standards are needed for electronic design. Those of us in the standards game have had successes and failures in identifying the needs of the design community for ongoing improvements to interoperability.

I have two questions for you, dear readers.

1. What standards should we develop now?

2. Do we need a compliance lab to test our products’ conformance to existing standards?

Let me know what you think. You can post a comment here, or if you wish to stay out of the public view, feel free to contact me directly. It’s easy to reach me through LinkedIn, Twitter @ karenbartleson, and good old fashioned email and phone.

Thanks!

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Posted in 1. Life in the Standards Lane | 4 Comments »

4 Responses to “What standards do we need now?”

  1. IEEE Standards are unavailable due to TECHSTREET and I am very upset about it. After two years of fighting this problem I am trying to get something changed about IEEE Standards purchases, which are unacceptable at this time. It is impossible to download IEEE Standards. After talking to Marcus Plessel at IEEE.org it is apparant that TECHSTREET DOES NOT FUNCTION. Please, get something done about it. IEEE Standards is the only reason I am a member of IEEE and not insurance. EDDIE M CHILDS, IEEE SENIOR MEMBER FOR 30 YEARS, PHONE xxx-xxx-xxxx.

  2. Standards are NOT A GAME. Engineers declare and follow a discipline, unlike doctors and lawyers who practice there chosen profession. Electrical Engineers are in high demand and needed in all industries at this time. Maybe you have the time to set on a cloud and look down at what might be accomplished, but the rest of the working class engineers have to get the jobs completed and we need standards to follow our chosen discipline. Staying ahead of changes in engineering is imparative and necessary to be a professional engineer in responsible charge. EDDIE M CHILDS, PE, eddie.childs@asagenergy.com

  3. Karen B says:

    Eddie, I’ll give you a call and talk with the people at the SA who can help with the Techstreet issues you’ve been having. I hope you don’t mind, I x’ed out your phone number to protect your privacy. If you’d like it to be public, please let me know and I’ll put it back.

  4. Karen B says:

    Eddie, “The Standards Game” is not meant to imply that we don’t take standards extremely seriously. As a fellow electrical engineer, I absolutely recognize the importance of standards. In fact, I have dedicated my career and much of my life to standards. I’ve sat on many committees that develop the standards that make today’s complex integrated circuits possible. I’m sorry if you think I’m sitting on a cloud looking down, but in reality I’m working very hard to solve serious issues and make the best possible standards available for people all over the world.

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A standards struggle of global proportions

Posted by Karen B on January 31st, 2013

fireworks I thought you might find this interesting. As I begin my two-year term as President of the IEEE Standards Association, these are the kinds of standards struggles that I’ll be exposed to. While not diminishing the importance of EDA standards (and the occasional struggle we’ve been through), this standards struggle puts ours in a whole new light, don’t you think?

A bit of background first. The ITU is an assembly of the United Nations which creates international communication standards, among other things. It uses a national-body-based process in contrast to a market-driven process (as most – if not all – EDA standards follow). A treaty, last updated in 1988, called the International Telecommunications Regulations was due for revision last year. And then, global thermo-standards war began…

US says it won’t ratify UN telecom treaty
By Jennifer Martinez     – 12/13/12 05:33 PM ET
The United States said Thursday that it will not sign a United Nations telecommunications treaty that U.S. technology companies warn would disrupt governance of the Internet and open the door to online censorship.

Full text

There are numerous articles about this topic. Let me know if you’d like me to post some more of them.

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